Tennis Socks

Remember when I was on a kick to knit my own tennis socks and fine tune the sock recipe? Yeah, it was fun. They wore really well. This summer, I wanted to make more.

Guess what? What I wrote on the blog was the extent of my notes on the recipes. Seriously. That’s it. At least I had the blog to refer back to, I guess, or I’d have nothing. Nothing.

tennissocks

This time, I’m making notes. There was a lot of ripping as I reconstructed the rolled rims. Hopefully, I won’t lose these notes.

These socks are slightly different from the first set because I’m using fishy lips heels. That has become my favorite short row heel construction method.

More on Indigo

If you go back and look at the color chart I posted yesterday, my favorite green is the indigo overdyed with osage orange. The result is a very clear green (left stripe, second square from the bottom in each strip) compared to the osage orange overdyed with indigo (top left square in each strip).

Now, this next bit is hearsay … I’ve heard it in some natural dye classes but have not been able to confirm this from internet nor book research (from my personal natural dye library of 4-5 books). Please take this with a grain of salt and drop me a note with references if you have more information one way or the other.

Unfortunately, I won’t be able to apply the indigo first, osage orange second at this weekend’s workshop. Indigo doesn’t bond to the fiber the same way that typical natural dye does. The indigo pigment actually nestles into the fiber rather than chemically bonds to the fiber. This is why your jeans, if truly indigo dyed, will fade in creases. That is where the pigment rubs off.

Anyway, what this means is that indigo can be released again in another dye pot, thus alter the dye pot for everyone else in the class. We were advised not to try this unless it is at the very end of the workshop. However, that means the dye may be exhausted and I wouldn’t be able to get accurate medium on medium dye strength.

I might try this myself at home to see what the color variations might be with indigo last vs. indigo first.

Glazing

glazing

Next weekend, I will be taking a workshop on natural dyes with Anni Redding. She will show us dyes using cochineal and osage orange in 3 different depths of shade: light, medium and dark. I plan to dye the squares I’ve woven with the Zoom Loom a while back.

Since I plan to overdye some of the samples, if time allows, I wanted to get an idea of what the colors might look like.

Since overdying is similar to glazing technique with watercolors, I pulled out 3 colors that are close to the cochineal (quinacridone magenta), osage orange (nickel azo yellow), and indigo (phthalo blue – green shade). I painted 3 strips in varying depths of shade and glazed over them with additional colors.

Bottom up:

  • 1st row/square: colors as is
  • 2nd set of 3 rows/squares: glazed with yellow first, then red over 2, then blue over last
  • 3rd set of 3 rows/squares: glazed over with red first, then red over 2, then blue over last

I pooped out over the darkest shade so they are not correct, but you get the idea. The order in which the glaze is applied does make a difference to the colors.

Anyway, fun coloring exercise. Let’s see how they turn out with dyes.

Zoom Zoom

ZoomSquareBlanks

If after my last post, you thought that I had been Zooming along, you would be correct. This is just a portion of the squares that I’ve woven.

What are those tags, you ask? These squares have been mordanted (in 10% alum solution) and ready for a natural dye workshop later this month. We will be working with Osage Orange and Cochineal.

No worries. I will be approaching the dye workshop with my usual AR/scientific approach, hence the number of squares for just 2 dye materials.

Why squares? I just wasn’t into dyeing lots of little tiny skeins of yarn that I have no idea what to do with after the workshop is over. I thought long and hard about what I can do with small bits of yarn and Zoom Loom squares came to mind. Rather than dyeing yarn and, gasp! cut the yarn and throw away bits, I thought I would weave them into squares first.

The idea is that I would piece the squares into a gamp-like lap blanket. This means a whole lot more plain white squares need to be woven up.

Yarn — unknown 2 ply white wool yarn from my workshop bits bin. I won’t have enough yarn to weave the number of squares I need for a lap blanket. I’ll have to figure out what type of wool this so I can try and make more yarn to match. I know it is a sturdy wool. This princess doesn’t have much “sturdy” wool stashed. Hopefully, there are enough workshop fiber that I can figure something out.